• RPV Statement on the Passing of Former Chairman Pat Mullins

    RPV Chairman John Whitbeck issued the following statement:

    “Republicans across Virginia are shocked and saddened to hear of the sudden loss of our former Chairman, Pat Mullins. Pat steered our Party through some of its most difficult times, and his presence will be sorely missed.”

    “To spend time with Pat was to sit with a master storyteller, and savvy deal maker. There were few people he hadn’t met, and fewer still that he didn’t have a story about, which he was always more than happy to sit and tell. The only things he loved to talk about more than politics were his grandchildren, and his work with the therapeutic riding community.

    “For many of us, the indelible image of Pat Mullins isn’t a party chairman in a suit, but a loving grandfather spending time with his family at Lake Anna – and I know Pat wouldn’t have it any other way.”

    “Our prayers are with the entire Mullins family. Pat Mullins was a wonderful man, a great Virginian, and we are thankful for the short time we got to spend with him.”  

    http://virginiagop.nationbuilder.com/

  • REPUBLICANS WELL REPRESENTED AT FAUQUIER COUNTY FAIR

    2016 County Fair booth 1

    Hazel ready to greet Fair goers after set up was completed

    We Republicans were well represented at this year’s Fauquier County Fair, showcasing our Republican candidates and Fauquier Republicans and providing voter information to our citizens, treats and trinkets for the kids, and hand fans for the sweltering visitors. And our Fauquier Republicans banner festooned the Fair sponsors row at the entrance!

    Many thanks to our 35 volunteers who made this happen!

    2016 CF Volunteers 1

    Supervisor Chris and Lynne helping with setup

    2016 CF Volunteers 2

    Volunteers engaging fair goers during the week

    2016 CF Volunteers 3

    Terry, Harry, Anne, Paul, Robin, Clyde, Dirk after packing up the tents

    2016 CF TomGarrett

    State Senator Tom Garrett, our candidate for Congress, spent time with us and visited with the voters,

    2016 CF VogelWebertFair

    as did our State Senator Jill  Vogel, Delegate Michael Webert,

    2016 CF MosierFair

    and Sheriff Bob Mosier.

    Special thanks to Harry Burroughs for organizing and scheduling our volunteers and running the show!  Job well done by all!

    But we’re not finished.  We will be sponsoring Republican booths at the September 10 Piedmont Harvest Fest, the September 24 Vint Hill Fall Festival, and the October 8 Remington Fall Festival.  So please keep an eye out for the  notices of these events and the opportunity to volunteer for the cause!

  • State Sen. Thomas A. Garrett Jr. won nomination as the 5th Congressional District Republican candidate.

    State Sen. Thomas A. Garrett, who won the final ballot with 58 percent, defeated Michael Del Rosso, Jim McKelvey and Joseph Whited to secure the GOP nomination as the 5th Congressional District candidate.

    The Richmond-Times Dispatch article describing the convention voting can be found at the following link.

    http://www.richmond.com/news/virginia/government-politics/article_515d39c0-e4a6-59d0-b5b5-a599dbca34a4.html

  • REPUBLICANS WELL REPRESENTED AT 2015 FAUQUIER COUNTY FAIR

    Gail and Anne

    Gail and Anne

    Dirk, John and Bob

    Dirk, John and Bob

    Bob and Maureen with daughter and grandaughter

    Bob and Maureen with daughter and grandaughter

    Tanya Wilcox

    Tanya Wilcox

    Anne and Judy

    Anne and Judy

    We Republicans were well represented at this year’s Fauquier County Fair, showcasing our Republican candidates and Fauquier Republicans and providing voter information to our citizens, treats and trinkets for the kids, and hand fans for the sweltering visitors.  And our Fauquier Republicans banner festooned the Fair sponsors row at the entrance!

    Many, many thanks to our 44 volunteers who made this happen!  Delegate Scott Lingamfelter stopped by as did Congressman Wittman’s staffer Stacy Whitehouse.  Our Treasurer Tanya Wilcox, Clerk of Court Gail Barb, and Commonwealth’s Attorney Jim Fisher volunteered as did our Republican candidates for Lee District Supervisor Chris Butler (for two whole days!) and for Sheriff Bob Mosier, and Delegate Michael Webert’s aide Conner Miller.

    Special thank yous to Hazel Lee Kizer and Donna Smith for organizing and scheduling our volunteers and Anne Clagett for running the show!

    Job well done by all!  But we’re not finished.  We will be sponsoring Republican booths at the September 12 Piedmont Harvest Fest, the September 26 inaugural Vint Hill Fall Festival, and the October 10 Remington Fall Festival.  So please keep an eye out for the  notices of these events and the opportunity to volunteer for the cause!

  • Online Donations added to online Dues payments and Associate Member application processing

    PayPal Donations, Dues Payments and Associate member applications now available. Annual dues payments and new Associate Member applications may also be mailed in. Please see the JOIN/DUES tab and DONATE button at the top of this page.

     

  • Del. Lingamfelter’s 2015 General Assembly Report

    3 March 2015

    Dear Friends,

    I apologize for the length of this, but I hope you will read this important update on what happened this year during the General Assembly Session.  I want to be accountable to you, and a good way to do that is to share with you what happened this year in Richmond.  The good news is we are not like Washington.  We actually get things done, on time, responsibly, and in a conservative manner.  I hope you agree with me that what we did in Richmond this Session is how government should work.  Consider this:

     The 2015 General Assembly adjourned ahead of schedule this year-for the first time in 15 years-demonstrating the clear contrast between Richmond and Washington.  While Washington is gridlocked with partisanship, Republicans in Richmond are leading and governing.

     We also passed a conservative, responsible and, most importantly, balanced state budget that spends $1 billion less in general funds than last year’s originally-adopted budget.  We rejected the Governor’s effort to impose the Obamacare Medicaid expansion on Virginians.  And we reprioritized funding for pay raises for state employees, teachers, and state troopers.

    On jobs, the House of Delegates remains laser-focused on improving Virginia’s economy.   We passed legislation to attract innovative new companies to Virginia, make it possible for entrepreneurs to get the funding they need, fought to protect Virginia’s status as a right-to-work state, and defeated job-killing legislation that would hurt small businesses.

     In higher education, making college more affordable was a top priority this year. I supported several bills to do just that, including legislation to cap unreasonable mandatory student fees, encourage colleges to offer affordable “flat-fee” degrees, and make it easier for families to find the information they need about college costs.   The House budget also included additional funding for more in-state tuition slots, financial aid, and transfer-student grants.

     In k-12 education, we continue to reform and improve our public schools.  Our goal is to give every child a path to succeed in the classroom.  We passed legislation to expedite SOL re-take tests and require schools to submit less paperwork to Richmond.  The budget funds a 1.5% teacher pay raise.

    In transportation, the House of Delegates continues to increase accountability in our transportation system; working to protect taxpayer dollars.  This year we changed the formula used to decide how transportation dollars are spent, sending more money to local governments.   We also passed legislation to require transit projects to be reviewed based on their metrics-just like every other transportation project.

     We worked on several other important and challenging issues: ethics reform, legislation to aid victims and protect students from sexual assault on campus, and changes to Virginia’s Alcoholic Beverage Control System to make it run more like a business and not a bureaucracy.

     But we had some bad ideas show up as well.  The House defeated liberal efforts to enact Michael Bloomberg’s radical gun-control agenda, fought to hold Attorney General Mark Herring accountable for his actions, and defeated efforts to roll back Virginia’s pro-life informed consent statutes that protect mothers and innocent life.

     So all-in-all, I think this was a good year-if you agree with me-that conservative governance works best for all of Virginia.  I take this job very seriously, and you can bet the liberals will try to defeat me this year as they have tried in the past.  That is why I will be running a well-focused and energetic reelection campaign starting today.

     Sincerely,

    Scott

    Scott Lingamfelter < scott@va31st.ccsend.com >

    Forward this email

    Paid for and Authorized by Friends of Scott Lingamfelter

    Friends of Scott Lingamfelter | P.O. Box 7175 | Woodbridge | VA | 22195

  • Robert’s Round-Up: The Federal Reserve Must Be Transparent and Accountable

    Website     Email Robert      Request Assistance       Request Flag     Visit Washington DC

    March 3, 2015

    Dear Friend,

    The Federal Reserve System supervises nearly all banking in the United States and plays a substantial role in the domestic and global economies. Since its creation in 1913, the Federal Reserve’s Board of Governors has expanded its power, and its role in monetary policy has gone relatively unchecked. Given the impact that its policies can have on our economy, the Federal Reserve must be transparent and its leaders must be held accountable to the American people.

    Enhancing the transparency of the Federal Reserve will improve the public’s understanding of the decisions the Federal Reserve Board makes, which have a profound impact on the American people and our economy. I am a cosponsor of the Federal Reserve Transparency Act, which would require a full audit of the Board of Governors within the Federal Reserve System and the Federal Reserve banks by the Comptroller General of the United States.

    Until we can institute more transparent policies for the Federal Reserve, we must continue to provide rigorous congressional oversight. Last Wednesday, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen testified before the House Financial Services Committee hearing entitled, “Monetary Policy and the State of the Economy.” I appreciate Chair Yellen’s testimony, particularly because I have serious concerns about Federal Reserve policies that make life more difficult for hardworking Americans and disproportionately diminish the ability of Main Street banks to provide vital capital in our rural communities.

    I am particularly concerned by the Dodd-Frank Act’s negative impacts and costs for community banks, small businesses, and consumers. A newly released Harvard study articulates how the Dodd-Frank Act has actually given Wall Street an advantage over Main Street – the exact opposite of what its proponents said it would do. The study found that since the enactment of Dodd-Frank, community banks’ share of the market has decreased due to the pressure of increased regulation. This means that community banks are providing fewer mortgages to customers and fewer loans to small businesses on our Main Streets.

    The study’s findings represent the impacts Fifth District Virginians have felt for years now. Though the Dodd-Frank Act was intended to rein in bad actors on Wall Street, instead, we have seen that it is disproportionately harming small Main Street banks, credit unions, and their customers by imposing one-size-fits-all regulatory schemes on community financial institutions. These regulatory impacts represent real costs and eliminate choices for consumers – both families and small businesses – on Main Streets from Chatham to Warrenton.

    The Federal Reserve has an obligation to tailor regulatory policy to account for the differences between large multinational institutions and smaller financial institutions and the customers they serve. During the hearing, I pressed Chair Yellen to explain what the Federal Reserve is doing to ensure that its system of regulation is not unduly impacting small financial institutions and dragging down our local economies as a result.

    I will continue to work with my colleagues on the Financial Services Committee to maintain robust congressional oversight of the Federal Reserve, and I remain committed to promoting policies that will incentivize economic growth to provide jobs and opportunities to all Fifth District Virginians.

    Click the image above or click here to watch video of Congressman Hurt questioning Chair Yellen at last week’s Financial Service Committee hearing.

    If you need any additional information or if we may be of assistance to you, please visit my website at hurt.house.gov or call my Washington office: (202) 225-4711, Charlottesville office: (434) 973-9631, Danville office: (434) 791-2596, or Farmville office: (434) 395-0120.

     

    Sincerely,

    Robert Hurt

    Washington, DC – 125 Cannon HOB * Washington, DC 20515 * Phone: (202) 225-4711
    Charlottesville – 686 Berkmar Circle * Charlottesville, VA 22901 * Phone: (434) 973-9631
    Danville – 308 Craghead St., Suite 102-D * Danville, VA 24541 * Phone: (434) 791-2596
    Farmville – 515 S. Main Street, P.O. Box O * Farmville, VA 23901 * Phone: (434) 395-0120
  • Del. Webert’s 2015 Session: Week 7 Update

    28 February 2015

    Dear Friend,

    The seventh and final week of the 2015 Virginia General Assembly session has adjourned, and I wanted to take a moment to provide you with a brief overview of several of the bills I have Patroned and Co-Patroned during my time in Richmond this year. In addition, I included information on legislation sponsored by the Business Development Caucus, which I co-chair, and how to access the state budget for your review.

    • HB1372; Patron: This legislation      will provide businesses with a fair chance to bid on contracts should their      Experience Rating have increased due to a third party not-at-fault accident.      Currently, businesses are precluded from bidding on contracts if their EMR      meet or exceed a particular threshold. This legislation passed the House unanimously,      but it failed to leave the Senate Committee on Commerce and Labor. After extensive      deliberation and debate, all parties involved have consented to workshop the      bill to ease the concerns of stakeholders.
    • HB1826; Chief Co-Patron: This bill      is intended to promote and sustain Virginia’s racing and breeding industry      by extending the steeplechase charitable exception to flat racing and harness      racing on Virginia Racing Commission approved sites. Rather than expanding      gambling or changing existing statues, this legislation enables charitable      organizations, such as Gold Cup, to engage in more diversified races and then      redirect funds to the localities where racing takes place. This legislation      is headed to the Governor for his review and signature. 
    • HB1645; Chief Co-Patron: A commonsense      piece of legislation that will support our local wineries, as well as, bed      and breakfast establishments by enabling guests at those particular establishments      to enjoy lawfully acquired alcoholic beverages in bedrooms, private guest areas,      and outside areas of the establishment so long as those areas are under the      control of the licensee. This legislation was passed by both chambers and awaits      the Governor’s consideration and signature.
    • HB2394 & HJ514; Patron: These      two bills were aimed at amending our current “Local Composite Index” (LCI)      system to help provide funding to schools in the 18th District.      These proposals called for a study of the system and providing localities with      the option to appeal their current LCI rating under the current system. While      these proposals did not make it to the House floor for a full vote, I believe      we have taken significant strides by advancing a meaningful discussion on this      critical issue.

    HB1372, HB1645, and HB1676 were pieces of legislation sponsored by the Business Development Caucus (BDC), a pro-business coalition of legislators which I co-founded. As in years past, the BDC held a number of roundtable meetings throughout the Commonwealth. The BDC has continued to be a positive influence in Richmond by keeping job creation and workforce development as a key focus of the General Assembly. The BDC’s initiatives helped Virginia to be named “America’s Best Place for Business” by Forbes Magazine in 2013. Upon the adjournment of the House, the BDC will once again begin holding roundtables. You can find more information about the BDC, our events, and our sponsored legislation by visiting www.bdcva.org.

    This year the House of Delegates has passed a number of bills that work to address critical issues including Standards of Learning reform, economic development, ethics reform and continued work on our budget. Information pertaining to all legislation and votes is available online at www.lis.virginia.gov. You are able to search by both bill number and House of Delegates Member.

    The House and Senate met in conference to resolve differences in our budget, and the finished budget can be accessed online by clicking here.

    The House’s budget eliminated more than $10 million in new fees and $42 million in new government debt, while also putting more money into classrooms and funding core functions of government. We took a conservative approach, opposing Medicaid expansion, but also working to strengthen existing safety net programs for those in the most need.

    As a result of our hard work this session on behalf of the citizens of the Commonwealth, we finished a day early. I look forward to returning to the district to see my wife and two sons, and the chance to discuss the proposals from this session with you- my constituents. Once my staff has relocated back to our district office, we can be reached via email at delmwebert@house.virginia.gov or by phone at (540) 999-8218.

    It is an honor to have the opportunity to serve you once again in the House of Delegates. If you would like to discuss my bills or any legislation that has come before the House of Delegates, please feel free to contact me. My office is happy to provide a number of constituent services or help answer any questions you may have about legislation.

    Sincerely,

    Michael Webert

    P.O. Box 406 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 698-1018 DelMWebert@house.virginia.gov

    follow on Twitter | friend on Facebook | read our blog | forward to a friend

  • Del. Webert’s 2015 Session: Week 6 Update

    20 February 2015

    Dear Friend,

    It’s week six of the General Assembly’s seven week legislative session, and I’m pleased to report that the following bills I’ve been working on are moving forward:

    • HB 2286: Ensures Virginia recognizes the restoration of right to own a firearm if the restoration has occurred in another state. (Will be voted on Monday)
    • HB 1372: This legislation will provide      businesses with a fair chance to bid on contracts should their Experience Rating      have increased due to a third party not-at-fault accident. (Still working its      way through committee)
    • SB 1002: Encourages local workforce      investment boards to implement pay-for-performance contract strategy incentives      for training services as an alternative model to traditional programs. (Will be voted on Monday)
    • HB 1826: This bill is intended to      promote and sustain Virginia’s racing and breeding industry by extending the      steeplechase charitable exception to flat racing and harness racing on Virginia      Racing Commission approved sites. Rather than expanding gambling or changing      existing statues, this legislation enables charitable organizations, such as      Gold Cup, to engage in more diversified races and then redirect funds to the      localities where racing takes place. (Headed to Governor for his signature)

    In addition, the House and Senate have been meeting in conference to resolve differences in our budget. Speaker Howell incorporated a rules change for the budget this year so that it will be posted for the public and the press to view at least 48 hours before we vote on it. The Richmond Times-Dispatch praised the new policy earlier this year, saying that “the move will increase public access.”

    Once the budget conferees finish their work, you can find their budget online by clicking here.

    The House’s budget eliminated more than $10 million in new fees and $42 million in new government debt, while also putting more money into classrooms and funding core functions of government. We took a conservative approach, opposing Medicaid expansion, but also working to strengthen existing safety net programs for those in the most need.

    MajorLegislation
    Governor McAuliffe has begun to sign legislation that’s passed both the House and Senate. This week, he signed Delegate Tom Rust’s bill to let Uber, Lyft and other transportation network companies to operate in Virginia.

    Charter Schools
    Some of our work doesn’t require the governor’s approval. I have always supported legislation to give parents and students more choices for the education that best fits their needs.
    Last week, the House and Senate passed identical resolutions to make it easier to establish charter schools in Virginia. If the same resolutions pass again next year and are approved by voters, it will be enshrined in Virginia’s constitution.

    “Tebow Bill”
    The first legislation to allow homeschooled students to participate in high school sports in Virginia was introduced twenty years ago. For the first time this year, it was approved by both the House and the Senate and will be going to the governor’s desk. There are more than 32,000 home schooled students in Virginia, and with the passage of the “Tebow Bill,” local school boards will have the option of letting them participate in school sports, clubs and group activities. If you support the Tebow Bill, you can let the governor know at 804-786-2211.

    Supporting Israel
    Serving in Virginia’s House of Delegates means making tough decisions and trying to do the right thing, even when it’s not popular with everyone. I voted in support of resolution because Israel is our ally in the Middle East and its people have the right to live in peace and defend themselves.

    House Democrats made national news this month when they twice left the House chamber to avoid voting on a resolution expressing support for the State of Israel. You can watch them here: http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/virginia-democrats-flee-vote-pro-israel-resolution_857090.html?utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=twitterfeed

    As always, I would love to hear your thoughts on the legislative matters before the General Assembly. Please feel free to share your opinion by contacting my office at (804) 698-1018 or DelMWebert@house.virginia.gov.

    Sincerely,

    Michael Webert

    P.O. Box 406 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 698-1018 DelMWebert@house.virginia.gov

    follow on Twitter | friend on Facebook | read our blog | forward to a friend

  • Del. Cole’s 18 February Legislative Update

    – Asset Forfeiture

    – Redistricting

    – Equal Rights Amendment

    ASSET FORFEITURE

    My House Bill (HB) 1287-, which would require a criminal conviction before property used in connection with a crime could be forfeited and taken by the government, was defeated by the Senate Finance Committee this week. They want to study the issue further before making a decision to limit forfeitures.

    While most Commonwealth’s Attorneys and Sheriffs use the program responsibly, the issue is clear to me, I think it is fundamentally un-American for the government to be able to take your property when you have not been convicted of a crime. I will continue to push this issue in the future.

    REDISTRICTING

    Every 10 years, after the US census is completed, political district lines must be redrawn to make sure that districts are roughly equal in population. The General Assembly has the responsibility of approving the lines for congressional and legislative districts, while local governments are responsible for approving local districts and precinct boundaries.

     Even though the next redistricting will not be done until 2021, numerous proposals have been put forward to change how districts are drawn. Usually, the proposals involve creating an independent or bi-partisan commission of some sort to draw the lines in order to try to take the politics out of the process. But those proposals require politicians to make the appointments to the independent commission, so I am not sure that they really take the politics out of the process. All they do is elevate the politics to a deferent, less transparent level; who gets appointed to the commission, who makes the appointments, etc… But on the surface, they sound good.

    Of course the goal is to eliminate or reduce gerrymandering, drawing districts to favor one political party or candidate over another. Looking back on recent history, I am not sure how effective gerrymandering has actually been. Republicans took control of the General Assembly during the 1990s in districts that were drawn by Democrats. During the last decade, Democrats took control of the state Senate and gained seats in the House in districts that were drawn by Republicans. In 2011, the last redistricting was in fact, bi-partisan as Democrats controlled the Senate while Republicans controlled the House.

     No matter who draws the lines, they will find it difficult to draw competitive districts in most of the state. Rural and suburban areas tend to be more conservative, so they usually favor Republicans, while urban and metropolitan areas are more liberal and tend to elect Democrats. With rare exceptions, this is true not only in Virginia, but throughout the country. Voters in each area tend to favor conservatives or liberals based on their own beliefs and views regardless of who draws district lines.

    The next redistricting is six years away, so there is plenty of time to consider various ideas and proposals. I will certainly favor any improvements to the process that improve fairness and transparency.

    EQUAL RIGHTS AMENDMENT

    Those of you who are my age or older will remember the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) from the 1970s, for the rest this may be a history lesson.

     The ERA was a proposed amendment to the US Constitution to prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex. What makes this amendment unique is that Congress placed a deadline on ratification of the amendment when it was submitted to the states. I believe this was intended to force the states to ratify the amendment quickly. To my knowledge, this is the only amendment on which Congress placed a deadline for ratification.

     The original deadline was 1979 which was extended by Congress to 1982. When the second deadline passed, Congress declined to extend it again.

    The amendment appeared to be heading towards ratification, when concerns were raised about potential unintended consequences of the language. Those concerns included infringement on religious rights and impact on public facilities. These concerns not only caused more states to refuse to ratify the amendment, but lead five states to rescind their ratification.

     In 1994, the Attorney General issued a formal opinion stating that because the Equal Rights Amendment was not ratified within the original or the extended time limit established by Congress for its ratification, it is no longer before the states for ratification.

     In recent years some have raised a novel legal theory, called the “Three-State Theory”, suggesting that three more states could validly ratify the now null and void ERA and that then Congress could by fiat revive the proposed amendment. Of course this theory ignores the fact that five states rescinded their ratification.

     After consulting with council, I could not find any of this theory sustainable as a matter of law. When it comes to amending the greatest source of secular law in the history of the world, the US Constitution, we should demand legal precision and not rest on questionable legal theories or opinions.

     This is not just my opinion alone. The House has declined to ratify the ERA on the grounds that it has expired numerous times in the past, including in 2014 when the House Elections subcommittee tabled Senate Joint Resolution 78 and 2013 when similar measures were defeated by the House Rules Committee.

     I certainly support equal rights for all, but the ratification period for the current ERA expired decades ago and the proposed amendment can no longer be lawfully considered by the Virginia General Assembly.

    In order for the General Assembly to be able to consider the ERA, the US Congress needs to resubmit the amendment to the states for ratification.

    If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact me.

    Mark Cole

    Delegate, 88th District
    Spotsylvania, Stafford, Fredericksburg, and Fauquier

    Delegate Cole <DCole@house.virginia.gov>          http://www.marklcole.com/